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    Protected: Citizen science photographic identification of marine megafauna populations in the Moreton Bay Marine Park
    Christine L. Dudgeon1, Carley Kilpatrick1, Asia Armstrong1, Amelia Armstrong1, Mike B. Bennett1, Deborah Bowden1, Anthony J. Richardson2, Kathy A. Townsend3, Elizabeth Hawkins4
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    Protected: Quandamooka country – The history and implications of the native title determination for (stakeholders of) Moreton Bay
    Mibu Fischer1,2, Darren Burns1, Valerie Cooms1,, Joel Bolzenius1,3 David Brewer2,4, Cameron Costello1

Protected: Citizen science photographic identification of marine megafauna populations in the Moreton Bay Marine Park

Authors
Christine L. Dudgeon1, Carley Kilpatrick1, Asia Armstrong1, Amelia Armstrong1, Mike B. Bennett1, Deborah Bowden1, Anthony J. Richardson2, Kathy A. Townsend3, Elizabeth Hawkins4
Author affiliations
  1. School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, Qld, 4072, Australia;
  2. School of Mathematics, The University of Queensland, Qld, 4072, Australia;
  3. Moreton Bay Research Station, The University of Queensland, Qld, 4072, Australia;
  4. Dolphin Research Australia Inc. PO Box 1960, Byron Bay, NSW, 2481
Corresponding author
c.dudgeon@uq.edu.au
Book

Moreton Bay Quandamooka & Catchment: Past, present, and future

Chapter

Chapter 6 Citizen Science

Research Paper Title

Protected: Citizen science photographic identification of marine megafauna populations in the Moreton Bay Marine Park

Cite this paper as:

Christine L. Dudgeon, Carley Kilpatrick, Asia Armstrong, Amelia Armstrong, Mike B. Bennett, Deborah Bowden, Anthony J. Richardson, Kathy A. Townsend, Elizabeth Hawkins. 2019. Protected: Citizen science photographic identification of marine megafauna populations in the Moreton Bay Marine Park. In Tibbetts, I.R., Rothlisberg, P.C., Neil, D.T., Homburg, T.A., Brewer, D.T., & Arthington, A.H. (Editors). Moreton Bay Quandamooka & Catchment: Past, present, and future. The Moreton Bay Foundation. Brisbane, Australia. Available from: https://moretonbayfoundation.org/

DOI

10.6084/m9.figshare.8085668

ISBN

*** TBA

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